©
vanessaprosser:

#mars
superseventies:

Cher, Sir Elton John and Diana Ross
xiza:

kalories:

guavai:


Maria Anwander The Kiss
“The Kiss was given to the MoMA as a donation without asking for permission. I entered the museum as a regular visitor and gave an intense French kiss to the wall. Next to the invisible kiss I then fixed a fake label, which simulated the style of a regular MoMA caption.”

this is so cheeky but beautiful 

I’ve always thought about putting a fake artwork in a museum.

love me
floricawild:

love em

I watched her wake. Eyes fluttering, trying to focus on the new day. I smiled and continued to watch. A smile, accompanied by a low-level moan and stretch, escaped from her. Those sounds make me melt. Her exhales make me melt. And all that is left is the desire to do nothing more and just get back in bed and melt with her.

h0neycomb:

purenoire:

Kate Shaw 

i have adored this artist for so long now

(via f-r-e-c-k-l-e-d)

leeshit:

A little gift for a good friend of mine:

Who Cares, 2014 (Acrylic on canvas, 8”x10”)

(via rawkiss)

rawkiss:

statueofthotness:

her impact

the booty

(Source: stevenmiesel)

rivae:

YAAAAAS
kidsamich:

Richard Meier - Douglas House
dadsworstnightmare:

naomi looking heavenlier than your faves

This scene in Inglourious Bastards, this particular part, was so brilliantly written. The characters are playing a game where you sit in a circle and write a famous person’s name on a card, flip it over, pass the card to the person next to you and stick it to your head without looking. Then you ask everyone questions to figure out who it is. This man- a Nazi commander- asked “Am I American?” (no but..) “Have I visited America?” (yes) “Was my visit fruitious?” (no) “Did I go against my will?” (yes) “Am I from a place you’d call exotic?” (yes) “Am I from the jungle?” (yes) “Did I go by boat?” (yes) “And when I got there was I bound with chains and presented in front of a crowd?” (yes!) “Well then. I know who I am. An African slave. No? Oh then I’m King Kong.” — and in one instance the viewer realizes the metaphor which King Kong was to the African slave trade (a truly Tarantino way of inserting social awareness through dialogue spoken by social oppressors) as well as takes a moment of almost comic relief to a very strange middle ground since we see just how intelligent and foolproof this man is. This is good filmmaking.